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Temperament Trait Strategies: Sensitivity

by Maxine
Posted July 30 2010 04:56pm
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Sensitivity : On The Temperament Wheel, is your child high or low? 

Low Sensitivity – this child is blissfully unaware of things that bother others.  These children don't easily pick up on interpersonal signals. They misread others obvious cues.

Comfort

  • Provide a secure place for your child to go to when she misreads others obvious cues.  This will help her feel safe enough to start to learn what went wrong.

Play

  • Use imaginary play to encourage your baby to label feelings and become more familiar with how others express emotions. (For example, tell him, "This is how a mad cat meows…and this is how a sleepy cat meows.")

Teach

  • Teach your child to recognize other people's feelings. For example, "Daddy is tired."
    Provide emotion coaching in empathy. For example, "Mommy hurts. Give her a kiss."  This helps your child become more sensitive to other people, and how to show her own emotions appropriately.

 

High Sensitivity these children react strongly to even mild lights, sounds, textures, tastes and pain.  They are super sensitive to even mild stimuli, and are profoundly distressed by thunderstorms or wet diapers.

Comfort

  • if you see emotional or threatening situations that may overwhelm your child, help to prepare him in advance. For example, if a thunderstorm is coming, stay close to your baby and talk about it calmly and soothingly. This will help him learn to stay calm when a scary situation arises.  It is also helpful if you can provide your child with a variety of relationships that are soothing and nurturing. This helps him find the world to be a safe place from which to explore.

Play

  • encourage your child to express her feelings—particularly when she's playing. (For example, tell him, "This is how a mad cat meows... This is how a sleepy cat meows.")  This helps her become more comfortable with and less threatened by other people's feelings.

Teach

  • Set limits very gently.  Highly sensitive children often just need "that look" to stop them in their tracks.   Being too stern can upset them way beyond what is needed to teach them.  By doing this your child will want to please you and learn from you.

 

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Parenting as a Team

by Maxine
Posted May 10 2011 02:46pm
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Before your baby was born, each of you had special dreams and visions, along with worries and fears. Now that your baby is here, it’s time to revisit your earlier thoughts and see where things stand now. The reality for most parents is that these dreams often change as your baby grows and as you move through the transitions of early parenthood.  

Download the Parenting as a Team Worksheet (PDF).

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Joint Parenting Team Plan for Baby

by Maxine
Posted May 12 2011 11:23am
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Review the following common baby care tasks – tasks that parents need to take care of. Share your thoughts with each other and develop a plan for how you will manage each. If you are not sure yet, don’t worry, review this after a week at home with your new baby and again after the first month. You will probably make some changes based on your actual experience. Use this worksheet not only to plan for baby, but also to identify what might become points of disagreement for the two of you.

Download the Joint Plan Team Plan for Baby Woksheet (PDF).

 

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Creating a United Front

by Maxine
Posted May 12 2011 11:29am
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Do you and your partner agree on everything? Of course not! It’s unusual for two parents to agree on everything. But we do know that the more parents agree, the easier it is to work together as a team. In the end, this allows your child to grow up in a more consistent and positive environment.

Mother: Sweetheart, Antoine looks much better in red. Why don’t you put his new red shirt on him instead of the blue one?
Father: “Red! What are you talking about? I think that blue is his best colour!”

Do you and your partner agree on everything? Of course not! It’s unusual for two parents to agree on everything. But we do know that the more parents agree, the easier it is to work together as a team. In the end, this allows your child to grow up in a more consistent and positive environment.

Below, you’ll find a worksheet that is made up of common areas related to your baby. These are areas where some parents have difficulty finding a common ground. Together with your partner, fill out the worksheet and identify the areas where you present a united front, those where you need to have some further discussion and the areas where you may have to learn to live with some differences. Review the areas where you do not agree. Decide whether you need to find a compromise or if it’s okay to have different beliefs.

Download the Creating a United Front Worksheet (PDF)

 

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