0

Your Picky Eating Toddler

by Maxine
Posted January 4 2012 08:55pm
Filed under:

Some children are picky eaters. They don’t like broccoli just because its green or they don’t like mushrooms because they’re mushy. Here are some suggestions for improving your child's eating habits.

First of all, don't call your child a "picky eater," or he may become one forever. Children's eating habits can develop and change for a lot of reasons. Their tastes are naturally evolving.

Have a wide variety of healthy foods available, recognizing that children do have different tastes. Set a good example by following healthy eating habits yourself, including having a good breakfast. If your child won't eat breakfast, make sure she has nutritious, high-energy snacks for getting to and from daycare or school.

Provide a variety of foods rich in calcium, not just milk. Include foods such as calcium-fortified orange juice, cheese, yogurt or calcium-fortified soy milk. Some children dislike milk.

Try to involve your child in planning, shopping for and preparing meals. Even two- and three-year olds can do this in a simple way.

Allow your child to help you make his favourite meals from time to time, even if it's not something you really enjoy.

Try not to make mealtime a battleground by nagging, threatening or arguing about your child's eating.

Try not to criticize your child's choices, or say that some foods are "bad." Instead, make sure that the foods offered are all healthy choices. Be creative.

Be patient. Your child's tastes in food will continue to change.

If, however, you feel that your child's eating habits are making her unhealthy, consult your child's physician.

Is your toddler a picky eater? How do you get her to eat healthy? Leave a comment below and tell us about the experiences you’ve had.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Inspiring your preschooler’s creativity

by Maxine
Posted January 3 2012 04:07pm
Filed under:

You don’t need to spend a lot of money to inspire your child’s creativity. Being creative doesn’t have to start with expensive materials from the toy or art store.

Creating toys and activities for children from recyclable materials or "beautiful junk" is important for two reasons:

  • Common household materials are an inexpensive way to provide play opportunities for young children
  • Children's creativity and thinking skills can be developed at the same time that you are being an environmentally conscious parent

The following list can be used along with scissors, glue, yarn, paint and markers, in order to construct and create anything your child's imagination suggests:

  • egg cartons
  • milk cartons (all sizes)
  • plastic containers, bottles and jugs with lids
  • boxes (large and small)
  • aluminum pie plates
  • styrofoam trays
  • paper towel and toilet rolls
  • cardboard tubing
  • old wrapping paper
  • road maps
  • muffin tins
  • popsicle sticks
  • old, clean paint brushes
  • wooden clothes pegs
  • used envelopes
  • old Christmas cards
  • old pantyhose
  • netting
  • paint chips/samples
  • pamphlets
  • brown paper bags
  • buttons (all colours, shapes and sizes)
  • egg shells
  • coffee cans and lids
  • empty film canisters
  • juice lids
  • carpet samples
  • spools; ribbon rolls
  • bottle caps
  • yarn; ribbons
  • magazines; catalogues; calendars
  • cloth scraps of different fabric
  • leather or suede remnants
  • lace, trim or rick rack
  • cardboard
  • hangers
  • beads; old jewellery
  • wood scraps; dowels
  • discarded wallpaper sample books
  • inner tubes
  • pipe lengths
  • old newsprint

Use recycled materials from around your house to inspire your child’s imagination and creativity while having fun together.

For more playtime, in the kitchen, singing and arts and crafts activities for your preschooler, visit the Activity Centre. 

Video Alert
Watch our Creative Play with Your Preschooler video to learn about incorporating Comfort, Play & Teach into the creative play time you spend with your child.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

What position should you lay your baby to sleep

by Maxine
Posted January 3 2012 12:39pm
Filed under:

Experts recommend that babies are always placed on their backs to sleep because this reduces the chances of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). SIDS, also called crib death, is when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly, for no apparent reason.

Some babies, however, develop flat spots on their heads as a result of always lying on their backs. This occurs because the weakness in their neck muscles can cause them to turn their head to the same side over and over again, and this puts pressure on their soft skulls.

Head flattening does not affect brain development, but in some cases it can be permanent. There are some things you can do to prevent flat head. For example, when putting your child to bed, you can alternate putting a mobile to the left and to the right of your baby, so he turns his head a different way every night. It's also important to make sure your child spends some time during the day lying on his tummy (learn more about tummy time), when you are there to watch him. In addition to helping you prevent flat head, spending time on their tummy is also important for babies' development.

For more detailed information on SIDS and flat head and other practical suggestions on how to prevent them, visit Caring for Kids (from the Canadian Paediatric Society) If you continue to be concerned about your child's flat head, however, talk to your doctor.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Your baby and learning more than one language

by Maxine
Posted January 2 2012 03:50pm
Filed under:

Fortunately, most young children can learn two or more languages as they grow up, especially in the years before they go to school. They might show slight delays in vocabulary growth in each language at first, because they are learning two or more sets of words at once. But by the time they have reached grade five, they often have a more advanced knowledge of language than other children who speak only one language.

When a child is learning two languages, she may mix words from both languages into her sentences, but she will eventually learn to separate the languages correctly.

You should go ahead and speak the language you are comfortable with to your child. It's also good to read to him in that language, and use it when you are playing with him, as well.

And remember, it's much better to speak to your child in your native language often than to talk very little because you think you should only speak in English or only French, and you aren't comfortable doing so.

Click here for more on teaching your child to speak two languages. 

Do you speak more than one language at home? Are you encouraging your baby to speak both? Post a comment and share your strategies with other parents.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
Visit Kidobi.com Today!
view counter

MOST POPULAR STORIES

One of our temperament traits, our innate reaction to the world, is First Reaction. Some people love novelty and change while others react with caution to new situations.
Read More »
You can use a variety of Comfort, Play & Teach strategies that are tailored to different temperament traits.
Read More »
What comes to mind when you hear the phrase Positive Parenting? Positive Parenting is the approach to parenting that we believe best supports all aspects of healthy child development.
Read More »

parents2parents
syndicated content powered by FeedBurner

 

FeedBurner makes it easy to receive content updates in My Yahoo!, Newsgator, Bloglines, and other news readers.
Learn more about syndication and Feedburner »

http://feeds.feedburner.com/parents2parents