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The Causes of Bedwetting

by Maxine
Posted September 5 2011 06:06pm
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Many children are unable to sleep through the night without wetting the bed. For most children, bedwetting fades away as they get older, usually by 5-6 years of age.

Here are several reasons why your child might wet the bed:

Your child may not have the bladder control needed to stay dry through the night. In fact, one in seven children wets the bed regularly past the age of three.

Your child might be a sound sleeper, and the urge to urinate doesn't wake her up.

Your child may be drinking too much before bedtime. This doesn't mean your child shouldn't have a drink before bed - just don't let her overdo it.

Your child may have a small bladder or he may just produce more urine at night. 

Your child may suffer from constipation. A bowel that has stool will press against the bladder. 

If your child is still wearing diapers, he may not feel motivated to stay dry through the night because he doesn't notice when he has wet himself.

Bedwetting can be a reaction to stress in your child's life. Things like a new brother or sister, a new daycare, experience or parents’ seperation may trigger it or make it worse.

Your child may have inherited  this from you.  Scientists have discovered a gene for bedwetting. If one parent wet the bed as a child, their child has a 25% risk of bedwetting. If both parents wet the bed as children, their child's risk increases to about 65%. (www.caringforkids.cps.ca)

And, in a few cases, there may be some physical problem causing your child to wet the bed, such as a urinary tract infection or physical abnormality.

If you have any reason to suspect your child may have some physical problem underlying night-time bedwetting, or if your child is embarrassed about wetting the bed, or if you think bedwetting is going on too long, consult your child's health care provider.

Whether you and your doctor decide to treat the bedwetting or simply wait for your child to outgrow it, be sure that your child knows bedwetting is not a bad behaviour. It is not his fault do not shame, punish or scold your child if he wets the bed. Provide comfort and support.

The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends that you talk to your doctor if your child: 

  • Wants to be dry at night and is concerned by the bedwetting. 
  • Is having daytime accidents. 
  • Is dry for many months and then suddenly starts bedwetting. 
  • Has other symptoms such as a frequent need to pee or a burning sensation when he pees. 
  • Is still wetting at 5 to 6 years of age (or older). 

Reference: Caring for Kids www.caringforkids.cps.ca, developed by the Canadian Paediatric Society.

Does your preschooler wet the bed? Share your experiences and stories by commenting below!

 

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How everyone can help when a baby arrives

by Maxine
Posted May 3 2012 11:22am

When a new baby arrives everyone wants to help out. To ease the transition, here are some helpful tips on what everyone can do when a new baby comes home.

Everyone can:
 

  • Lower expectations for maintaining household tasks and the usual routine - help mom to choose a minimum of tasks that are manageable for the day.
  • Encourage mom to sleep or rest when the baby sleeps - if she finds this hard to do, suggest she start by sitting down for a short time, having a tea or a bubble bath, calling a friend or reading a magazine.
  • Advise mom to accept people's offers to help, or ask other family members and friends for help, especially so mom can get some time for herself.
  • Acknowledge that, for mom, leaving the baby with another caregiver is a big step - suggest that mom initially go out for a short period, leaving the baby with someone trusted and experienced.
  • Listen to how mom, partners, siblings and other family members are feeling - help them to understand and accept that fatigue, jealousy, guilt and doubts mixed with happiness, pride, love and excitement are normal.

If people want to visit and mom or other family members are too tired, learn how to discourage visitors politely by finding words to gently say "Thanks for thinking of us, but today is not a great day for visitors."

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Preparing your toddler for the arrival of a new baby

by Maxine
Posted January 4 2012 04:24pm
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When you’re expecting another child you want to ensure that your toddler is prepared for the changes that a new sibling will bring. Our experts have created some tips to help you make the transition a little smoother.

  • Let your child know that the baby is coming two or three months before the birth. Talk about the changes that will take place in the household and answer any questions she may have about birth and reproduction in a way that suits her age.
  • Assure your child that you will love him just the same.
  • Make your child feel important by saying, "You're going to be a big brother (or sister)." Let your child know he has a role and a relationship with the new baby.
  • Have your child help in choosing a name and in picking out baby clothes. Let your child feel the baby kicking.
  • Take your child to visit someone else's new baby so he can learn what to expect and get used to the size and sounds of an infant.
  • If you are the mother, encourage your partner to spend more time with your child before the birth so she becomes used to that before you get too busy with the baby.
  • If your child is going to be moved out of a crib and into a bed, it's best to do this long before the new baby arrives. This gives your older child time to become attached to the "new bed." This way he won't think the move out of a favourite sleeping place (the crib) was because of the new baby.
  • Read children's books that are about new babies to your child.

How did your toddler react when you became pregnant? When you brought home the baby? Share your story with other parents by leaving a comment below.

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Understanding what your preschooler is saying

by Maxine
Posted January 3 2012 09:44pm
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Learning to talk is a gradual process. It's common for a child's speech to become less clear as she tries to use more words with more difficult sounds, because these require more effort and motor control.

Your child may in fact end up saying as little as possible during different stages of learning to talk, or he may begin to act up, out of his frustration at not being able to communicate the way he'd like.

It is very important for parents to pay close attention to their child's attempts to communicate, and to encourage these attempts. Here are some tips to use if you're having trouble understanding what your child is trying to say:

If you don't understand what your child is saying, encourage her to repeat it by saying things like "Tell me again" or "Tell me more."

If you got part of what your child said, repeat the part that you understood, and ask him to fill in the missing parts.

Watch your child closely. Watch for eye movements or gestures that might give you a hint about what she is trying to say.

You can also ask your child for help, and make it appear like you're having trouble hearing by saying things like "I didn't quite hear that" and ask him to say it again.

If after all of your attempts, you still can't understand what your child is trying to tell you, you may have to apologetically say that you do not understand.

Usually children's speech improves over time. But if you are concerned that your child's speech isn't improving or if your child keeps acting up out of frustration over not being able to be understood, you may want to discuss this with your child's doctor or call the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists at 1-800-259-8519, and they will guide you to an appropriate referral.

Do you ever have trouble understanding what your preschooler is trying to say? Share your experience with other parents by leaving a comment below!

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