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Comfort, Play & Teach and your toddler’s social development

by Maxine
Posted December 16 2010 06:38pm
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Every day, there are plenty of opportunities to use Comfort, Play & Teach: A Positive Approach to Parenting. The following examples from our experts show how you can support the social development of your toddler while doing your routine errands.

Describe your toddler’s good behaviour when you go out in public together. For example, when you are at the bank, say things like “You are being so patient while we are waiting in line”. This will give your child a sense of comfort and help her feel good about her skills. 

Make play a part of your errands by making a stop at the park or by inviting another parent and child to come along so that your child can enjoy interacting with other children in different environments. This will make errands more fun for both of you and help your child learn to interact with others. 

Outings with your toddler are full of opportunities to teach your child to respect limits and obey rules. Remember that children are more likely to cooperate and comply with your requests when you teach them in a positive way by saying things like “Please hold my hand when walk on the sidewalk” instead of “Don’t let go of my hand”.

Have you tried any of these strategies with your toddler? How did it work? Leave a comment below and share your story with parents just like you!

 

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Helping your toddler stop bedwetting

by Maxine
Posted December 17 2010 03:20pm
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Here are several strategies from our experts that you can try to help your toddler stop wetting the bed:

Limit how much your child drinks after dinner especially any drinks with caffeine. Try and limit any fluids 2 hours before bedtime.

Use training pants and not diapers.  Diapers may interfere with your child’s motivation to get up and use the bathroom. 

Make access to the bathroom easy. Place a nightlight in the bathroom or leave the hall light lit.  

Encourage your child to empty his bladder a second time, just five minutes after the first time, right before bed.

Wake your child during the night to go to the toilet. However, some experts say that if she's not really awake, it's almost like encouraging her to pee while she's sleeping.  

And, place a portable toilet by your child's bed so that if he wakes up and has to go quickly, he can.

Use of rewards and punishments is no longer recommended as an effective way to manage bedwetting.

If the bedwetting continues despite all your efforts, consult your child's doctor for more specific strategies.

 

Did you use any of these strategies to help your toddler stop wetting the bed? Which ones worked for you? Leave a comment below and share your story with other parents.

 

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Toilet learning when you’re away from home

by Maxine
Posted August 27 2010 02:19pm
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It’s almost inevitable that your toddler will be away from home at some point during the toilet learning process. If your child is regularly in daycare or child care then it is definitely going to happen.

Our experts have put together a few ideas to help with your child's toilet learning (or potty training) when he is away from home:

When taking your child shopping or out for errands, encourage him to use the potty before you leave home. Make sure his clothes are loose, so that you can take them off quickly at a public washroom. Bring along extra diapers, training pants and a change of clothes. While out, check with your child to find out when you should head for the washroom. Take him to the washroom after he has had any food or drink, and make sure to stay with him while he uses the toilet, especially in unfamiliar places.

Teach your child standard terms, like "pee" and "poo" so that daycare teachers and other caregivers will know what your child is talking about when he asks to go.

Talk to your child's caregivers about your expectations for toilet learning. Explain to them what stage your child is at, and what kind of routine he is used to at home. This will help make toilet learning a more positive, consistent experience for your child, no matter where he is.

How did you handle the toilet learning process when your child was away from home? Share your tips and ideas with other parents by leaving a comment below. You can also send in a question on this topic for one of our experts!

 

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Preventing Shopping Mall Meltdowns

by Maxine
Posted September 5 2011 05:02pm
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You’re headed towards the check-out counter when your toddler spots a colourful candy display. You quickly try to focus his interest elsewhere, but it’s too late. He asks for candy and you explain that he’s already had a treat today, dreading what is likely to come next. He arches his back and starts to wail as you look nervously at the shoppers around you and brace for a shopping meltdown. 

When your child has a tantrum in public it’s hard not to have a meltdown yourself, but there are things you can do to try and avoid these blow-ups.

“Remember that shopping can be really overwhelming for babies and young children,” says Kris Langille, a Registered Nurse and Parenting Expert. “Children can be over-stimulated by stores and may become more difficult to manage in response to this.”

It's not always easy to discipline a child while others are watching. However, it's important that you try to be consistent with what you would do at home. Often it may seem easier to look the other way or give in to a demanding child, rather than deal with it right there. However, inconsistency may encourage even more demanding behaviour in the future.

Our experts have put together some strategies you can try when going out, in order to prevent your child from having a tantrum:

  • Try to remain calm and maintain firm limits from the beginning to the end of the trip. 
  • Talk to your child while you shop, run errands and so on - engage her attention. Ask her opinion, and ask her to help you find what you are looking for.
  • Allow your child to participate in what you are doing. For example, if you are shopping, let him help pick out the fruit.
  • Don't go on an outing when your child is tired, hungry or ill.
  • Try to keep trips short.
  • Bring a snack along to make sure your child does not become hungry, and so you won't be tempted to give your child a treat in an effort to stop a tantrum.

Has your child ever had a meltdown at the shopping mall or grocery store? What did you do? How do you keep these from happening? Share your story with parents just like you by leaving a comment below.

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