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Your toddler's language development

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 03:37pm
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Language skills start unfolding from the very start of your child’s life. During the first 18 months, babies identify the sounds of their language and “practice” using them by babbling. By 18 months, they are able to say about 50 words (but they understand many more). Around the 2nd year, children’s vocabulary increases by leaps and bounds. They learn approximately 9 words per day! By 5 years, most children have mastered the grammar of their language. They are able to tell simple stories and describe events in their lives. While children go through the various stages of language acquisition at their own speed, they tend to hit the major milestones in the same order. Find out more about these milestones.

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Remember that all children acquire language at their own pace – some abilities may come earlier, others may come later. However, if you are concerned about any aspect of your child’s language, contact the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists at 1-800-259-8519, and they will guide your to an appropriate referral.

When did your child say her first word? What was it? Were you ever afraid that she was taking to long to start talking? Share you experiences below by leaving a comment.

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Your toddler and learning more than one language

by Maxine
Posted January 4 2012 01:48pm
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Fortunately, most young children can learn two or more languages as they grow up, especially in the years before they go to school. They might show slight delays in vocabulary growth in each language at first, because they are learning two or more sets of words at once. But by the time they have reached grade five, they often have a more advanced knowledge of language than other children who speak only one language.

When a child is learning two languages, she may mix words from both languages into her sentences, but she will eventually learn to separate the languages correctly.

You should go ahead and speak the language you are comfortable with to your child. It's also good to read to him in that language, and use it when you are playing with him, as well.

And remember, it's much better to speak to your child in your native language often than to talk very little because you think you should only speak in English or only French, and you aren't comfortable doing so.

Click here for more on teaching your toddler to speak two languages.

Do you speak more than one language at home? Are you encouraging your toddler to speak both? Post a comment and share your strategies with other parents.

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