HOME
view counter
0

Ten Things to Remember When Your Child is a Preschooler

by Maxine
Posted July 27 2010 07:03pm
Filed under:

1. At about this age, children start to think more about the feelings of others.

So you can talk with your child about things he does that affect other people. For instance, ask how he would feel if someone interrupted while he was talking. You might agree on a signal, like touching your arm, for when he wants a turn to talk.

2. During the preschool years, your child will learn to share you with other people.

Give her the chance to be involved with you or other children for short periods of time. Praise her for the times when she is playing contentedly on her own.

3. Encourage your preschooler to try new things.

But don’t push him beyond his limits. An activity may seem easy to you, but your child may not be ready for it. Listen to your child, especially when he’s scared. Don’t make him try something because you want to do it or you see other children doing it.

4. Resist the impulse to take over your child’s play and make it better.

This reduces her self-confidence. It makes her feel as if her work isn’t worthy of your appreciation.

5. The most important way to build your child’s self-esteem is to make sure he knows he’s loved.

Then he begins to see himself as a good, lovable person. Each time your child learns a new skill, right from the earliest days, let him know how well he has done. You should also encourage him to cope with new situations. But only expect what’s likely for his age, not perfection.

6. Give your preschooler lots of chances to play – alone, with brothers and sisters, with other children and with you.

When your child plays, she is practicing skills in every area. She thinks, solves problems, talks, moves, co-operates and makes moral judgments. Play is helping her to get ready for the real world.

7. Praise your child’s attempts to try new things and to deal with frustrating situations.

Never punish, shame or ridicule a child who tries and fails. This can damage or destroy their fragile self-esteem. For the same reason, don’t look for perfection or constant success. Expect only what your child is capable of for his age and stage of development.

8. Make it clear what your expectations and limits are – it helps to prevent problems.

Enforce these limits consistently but always respect your child. Try not to yell or humiliate her. And never use physical punishment.

9. When you spend time with your child, let him take the lead sometimes.

Choose what you’ll do together by talking about possible choices and exchanging points of view.

10. A child needs to be given choices as she builds confidence and independence.

Deciding what to wear each day is a good place to start. Offer your preschooler two or three choices that suit the weather and (hopefully) the occasion. Even if her choices aren’t what you’d prefer, be happy that your child is happy.

Also See: 

 

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
www.WelcometoParenting.com
view counter

MOST POPULAR STORIES

One of our temperament traits, our innate reaction to the world, is First Reaction. Some people love novelty and change while others react with caution to new situations.
Read More »
You can use a variety of Comfort, Play & Teach strategies that are tailored to different temperament traits.
Read More »
What comes to mind when you hear the phrase Positive Parenting? Positive Parenting is the approach to parenting that we believe best supports all aspects of healthy child development.
Read More »

POLL

This week's poll
Do you “drop everything” if a friend calls and invites you over for a play-date?
 

parents2parents
syndicated content powered by FeedBurner

 

FeedBurner makes it easy to receive content updates in My Yahoo!, Newsgator, Bloglines, and other news readers.
Learn more about syndication and Feedburner »

http://feeds.feedburner.com/parents2parents