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Comfort, Play & Teach and your preschooler’s social development

by Maxine
Posted December 20 2010 10:53am
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Every day, there are plenty of opportunities to use Comfort, Play & Teach: A Positive Approach to Parenting. The following examples from our experts show how you can support the social development of your preschooler while doing your routine errands. 

Give your child a special responsibility, such as choosing which kinds of fruit you buy. Letting your preschooler express his independence is comforting to him and helps him gain confidence and a stronger sense of self. 

When you get back home, play pretend games with your child to give him a chance to explore in more detail some of things you have done on your errands. For example, take turns pretending you are the post-office clerk and costumer, and help your child think of what he would say in these situations to help him practice different types of social interactions. 

Teach your child some valuable pro-social skills by encouraging him to carry a small bag for you, asking him to help you keep an eye on his little sister, and showing him how to put his used wrappers, juice bottles, etc. in garbage cans and recycling bins.

 

Did you use any of these strategies with your preschooler? How well did they work? Leave a comment below and share your story with other parents.

 

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Helping your preschooler learn to play with others

by Maxine
Posted December 22 2010 05:22pm
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As your young child learns to play with others, she may need your help to learn what behaviour is acceptable. If you see that your child is upset when playing, encourage her to put all her emotions, particularly her frustrations, into words. Try to identify with your child's feelings, but let her know that there are still certain ways that one should behave in such a situation: "You want to play with that puzzle, but Jason has it now. Even though you really, badly want it, you will have to wait."

If there's been a problem with another child, help your child see the other child's point of view, and talk about possible solutions to the problem. "You grabbed Jason's puzzle and now he is very sad. Please give Jason the puzzle back and wait until he is finished." You will need to be a good role model, as your child will be watching you to learn social skills. You will need to avoid reactions like rudeness or impatience. Little children watch adults all the time, and copy our worst as well as our best behaviour.

Making friends works best if you let your child choose when he wants to play and whom he wants to play with. Children don't necessarily become friends with each other just because their parents are friends or relatives. Learning to get along with others takes time, so don't push your child to play with others. 

If your child is having difficulty becoming part of the group or getting along with others, watch him, and see if there are ways you can help him join in. Sit on the sidelines with him and discuss what is happening in the room, where he would like to play and how he could join in to be accepted. Or give your child a toy that will fit in with the group's play, in order to help him join the group.

 

How did you help your child learn to play with others? At what age did they start having an easier time? Leave a comment below and share your story with other parents just like you!

 

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Avoiding nagging your preschooler

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 01:15pm
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Pick up your toys! Eat your dinner! Hang up your coat! Sound familiar?

When you tell your preschooler over and over again to do something, she can become pretty good at tuning you out.

Here are several ways to avoid nagging all the time:

Talk to your child when everyone is calm, about what is expected, what the rules are and develop a schedule for the tasks.

When your child doesn't do what you want, instead of nagging, go to your child, get her attention, ask what she is feeling about the task and why she is hesitant to do it. Then, after you've dealt with your child's reasons, in a calm way make it clear what your child is to do. If your child often refuses to do, or never gets around to doing what you expect, speak to other parents to find out if what you're expecting is reasonable. And ask what they do that works, instead of nagging, that gets things done.

Don't nag to the point where you're yelling and making threats about what will happen if your child doesn't do what she's asked, especially threats you know you won't carry out ("If you don't pick up your coat, you'll have to wear it for a week straight!"). This is usually ineffective. Once you've lost your temper, all that most children think about is how upset you are. Be calm and consistent. Say what you mean, and mean what you say. Follow-through is very important.

Do you find it hard to refrain from nagging your preschooler? Do you have your own strategies for reducing how often you nag your child? Share it with other parents by leaving a comment below!

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Turn Fright Night into Fun Night: Comfort, Play & Teach Tipsheet

by Maxine
Posted October 24 2011 12:11pm
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mom and child on halloween

Halloween can be as much an evening of fun, dress-up, and too much candy, as it can be a night of scary goblins, strange noises and haunted houses. Our experts have come up with some ways in which parents can use Comfort, Play and Teach to enjoy both the tricks and the treats of this spooky and exciting night.

 

 

Download this Halloween Comfort, Play & Teach Tip Sheet.


Check out our other Halloween Tipsheet!

 

 

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