0

Finding quality time with your preschooler

by Maxine
Posted December 20 2010 12:21pm
Filed under:

Work, household chores and social activities all put a strain on your time with your preschooler. It's really important to spend quality time together. This will help build a trusting relationship, and reassure your child that he can count on you. But you can't turn on quality time like a light switch. It comes sometimes when you least expect it, if you spend enough relaxed time and do enough things together.

You will, no doubt, start by looking for things that you can do to free up more time for family, such as:

  • Deciding which household chores can be left undone or be done imperfectly in order to make more family time.
  • Leaving certain things until after your child has gone to bed to make the most of your time together.
  • Turning some routines, such as driving to daycare or doing the dishes, into quality time by singing together or talking seriously about what is happening in your lives.

There will be occasions when the time you spend with your preschooler may have to be juggled around a bit, but try not to skip them entirely. Also, try to spend time alone with EACH of your children.

Remember that children like things that are predictable. So plan your quality times so that they can take place regularly. Maybe you can eat dinner together, or go to the park first thing every Sunday morning.

 

How do you find quality time to spend with your preschooler? What advice would you give to other parents? Leave a comment and share your story below!

 

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

How do preschoolers learn to share?

by Maxine
Posted December 22 2010 05:33pm
Filed under:

Trying to get your preschooler to share? Sometimes it seems impossible and sometimes they surprise you with their generosity!

Knowing how to share is an important skill for getting along with others, but parents shouldn't expect a child to really understand "sharing" until age four.

It's not surprising that it takes time to be able to share. There is a lot to learn. Children have to be able to control their impulse to grab something. They have to be able to see another child's point of view, understand time well enough to feel that it's okay to wait for what they want and be able to talk enough to sort out who gets what, and when.

Preschoolers are at the next stage. They spend a fair amount of their playtime working out who will have what, who will do what and who can play. This is normal - it's how they practice the social skills needed for friendships. At this stage, children are better able to exchange both ideas and toys. They like to give and take

If by age four your child still doesn't cooperate with others, and is hostile, it's best to get some help. Consult your child's physician for referrals to appropriate family services in your area.

 

How do you encourage your preschooler to share? Leave a comment below and let us know!

 

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Avoiding nagging your preschooler

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 01:15pm
Filed under:

Pick up your toys! Eat your dinner! Hang up your coat! Sound familiar?

When you tell your preschooler over and over again to do something, she can become pretty good at tuning you out.

Here are several ways to avoid nagging all the time:

Talk to your child when everyone is calm, about what is expected, what the rules are and develop a schedule for the tasks.

When your child doesn't do what you want, instead of nagging, go to your child, get her attention, ask what she is feeling about the task and why she is hesitant to do it. Then, after you've dealt with your child's reasons, in a calm way make it clear what your child is to do. If your child often refuses to do, or never gets around to doing what you expect, speak to other parents to find out if what you're expecting is reasonable. And ask what they do that works, instead of nagging, that gets things done.

Don't nag to the point where you're yelling and making threats about what will happen if your child doesn't do what she's asked, especially threats you know you won't carry out ("If you don't pick up your coat, you'll have to wear it for a week straight!"). This is usually ineffective. Once you've lost your temper, all that most children think about is how upset you are. Be calm and consistent. Say what you mean, and mean what you say. Follow-through is very important.

Do you find it hard to refrain from nagging your preschooler? Do you have your own strategies for reducing how often you nag your child? Share it with other parents by leaving a comment below!

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

School and balancing a new routine

by Maxine
Posted August 22 2011 07:17pm
Filed under:

Starting child care or kindergarten is an important change for both you and your child. It may stir up many different feelings, and will likely affect your daily routine. Here are some suggestions that might help you cope more easily with this new transition and turn it into Comfort, Play & Teach® time!

Comfort

Your child may need reassurance about her new teacher and learning environment. Prepare her for the new experience by talking about it ahead of time, and if possible, visit the new classroom and meet the teacher. School will seem more familiar that way, and going there each day may be easier.

Encourage your child to participate in daily tasks like choosing the clothing he will wear to school the next day. Routines can provide him with a sense of predictability and security by enabling him to anticipate what will happen, and will give him some needed control over the new situation.

PLAY

Both you and your child will have busy days now and will need opportunities just to relax and enjoy each other's company! Remember to set aside special time to go to the library, play at the park, bake blueberry muffins, dance to music or to simply cuddle up together and talk about the best part of your day.

Provide your child with items she will need for playing school with her dolls. She will enjoy showing them how to colour, looking at books, singing the alphabet song, and printing with chubby pencils! Role playing school experiences will help her gain confidence as she practices all the new skills she is learning.

TEACH

Before bed time, relax and read books together like Franklin Goes to School (by Paulette Bourgeois) or Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten (by Joseph Slate). The words and pictures describe typical experiences at school, and will give your child a chance to ask questions and perhaps work out his fears.

Share some of your favourite memories of school with your child. Show him school pictures and tell stories about your classroom, teachers and friends. He can compare similarities and differences between your school experience and his. Most importantly, he will learn that you were once a child and that you understand what he is experiencing now.

How do you balance new routines with your preschooler? Was it hard to get a new routine in place when he started school? Share you experience with other parents by leaving a comment below.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
Visit Kidobi.com Today!
view counter

MOST POPULAR STORIES

One of our temperament traits, our innate reaction to the world, is First Reaction. Some people love novelty and change while others react with caution to new situations.
Read More »
You can use a variety of Comfort, Play & Teach strategies that are tailored to different temperament traits.
Read More »
What comes to mind when you hear the phrase Positive Parenting? Positive Parenting is the approach to parenting that we believe best supports all aspects of healthy child development.
Read More »

parents2parents
syndicated content powered by FeedBurner

 

FeedBurner makes it easy to receive content updates in My Yahoo!, Newsgator, Bloglines, and other news readers.
Learn more about syndication and Feedburner »

http://feeds.feedburner.com/parents2parents